The nation’s highest court began to hear arguments Thursday morning over whether to disqualify former President Donald Trump from the ballot in the 2024 presidential election.

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Arguments began after the Supreme Court convened at 10 a.m. EST. A decision is expected at a later date, although an exact timeline has not been released.

See the latest updates from court:

Congress has the role of determining eligibility for office, Trump attorney says

Update 10:40 a.m. EST Feb. 8: An attorney for Trump, Jonathan Mitchell, argued Thursday that “even if a candidate is an admitted insurrectionist,” the Constitution still allows them “to run for office and even win election to office.”

He said that after the election, Congress would have the ability to allow the person to take office or to disqualify them.

Trump attorney: Former president not an officer of the US under Constitution

Update 10:20 a.m. EST Feb. 8: Jonathan Mitchell, an attorney representing Trump, began addressing the court on Thursday with a brief opening statement in which he highlighted the claim that the 14th Amendment does not apply to Trump because, under the Constitution, he is not considered an officer of the United States.

Under the 14th Amendment, people are barred from holding public office if they have “engaged in insurrection” after swearing “as an officer of the United States … to support the Constitution.”

Mitchell called the Colorado Supreme Court’s decision “wrong” and said it “should be reversed for numerous, independent reasons.”

Arguments begin

Update 10:13 a.m. EST Feb. 8: The Supreme Court has begun to hear arguments in the case seeking to remove Trump from the ballot in the 2024 presidential election.

Original report: The debate will center on a decision handed down in December by the Colorado Supreme Court which found that Trump engaged in insurrection during the Jan. 6, 2021 violence at the U.S. Capitol, making him ineligible to run for office. Under the 14th Amendment of the Constitution, people are barred from holding public office if they have “engaged in insurrection” after swearing “as an officer of the United States … to support the Constitution.”

Attorneys representing Trump argued in a court briefing that the former president is not an “officer of the United States” under the Constitution and that, even if he was, “he did not ‘engage in’ anything that qualifies as ‘insurrection.’”

A crowd breached the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021, as Congress was gathered to formalize President Joe Biden’s 2020 presidential election win over Trump. One person died in the chaos, which was also linked to four other deaths.

Trump has also been barred from appearing on Maine’s presidential primary ballot. That decision and the one out of Colorado have been put on hold to allow the latter case to go through the Supreme Court.

The former president is also facing federal charges in Washington, D.C., in connection with the violence at the Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021.

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