A polling place in Minneapolis. (Stephen Maturen/Getty Images)

Former President Donald Trump began his bid for a third Republican nomination with wins in Iowa and New Hampshire, bringing him closer to a rematch with President Biden. But Nikki Haley, Trump’s lone remaining challenger, has vowed to stay in the race through at least the South Carolina GOP primary on Feb. 24.

Up next is Nevada, which is holding a primary for Democrats and Republicans on Feb. 6 followed by GOP caucuses on Feb. 8. After that, South Carolina and Michigan will hold GOP primaries, which will be followed by Super Tuesday — when more than a third of all GOP delegates will be up for grabs — in early March.

Before you know it, it will be summer, when both parties hold their conventions. And after the presidential debates — which are still on the schedule despite Trump’s unwillingness to participate in the GOP debates — it will be Election Day.

Here are just some of the key dates on this year’s political calendar, a few of which are subject to change.

2024 election calendar

Former President Donald Trump points to his supporters during his caucus-night event in Des Moines, Iowa.Former President Donald Trump points to his supporters during his caucus-night event in Des Moines, Iowa.

Former President Donald Trump in Des Moines, Iowa. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images) (Chip Somodevilla via Getty Images)

• Jan. 15: Iowa GOP caucuses

Trump scored a decisive victory, while Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis edged out former U.S. Ambassador to the U.N. Nikki Haley for second place. Entrepreneur Vivek Ramaswamy finished a distant fourth, suspended his campaign and endorsed Trump.

• Jan. 23: New Hampshire primary

Trump defeated Haley, his lone remaining challenger in the GOP race after DeSantis dropped out two days before the primary. Biden won in New Hampshire despite not being on the ballot due to a rift between the Granite State and the Democratic National Committee, which decided to make the South Carolina Democratic primary on Feb. 3 its first formal contest.

• Feb. 3: South Carolina Democratic primary

Facing nominal opposition in a state where he has long been a favorite among Democrats, Biden won easily, capturing more than 96% of the vote with self-help author Marianne Williamson and Minnesota Rep. Dean Phillips splitting the rest.

• Feb. 6, Feb. 8: Nevada primary and caucuses

A woman takes a selfie before Trump speaks at a rally in Las Vegas.A woman takes a selfie before Trump speaks at a rally in Las Vegas.

A woman takes a selfie before Trump speaks at a rally in Las Vegas on Jan. 27. (John Locher/AP) (ASSOCIATED PRESS)

On Tuesday, Nevada will hold a primary, and Haley will be the only major Republican candidate on the ballot. Then, two days later, on Feb. 8, the Nevada Republican Party will hold caucuses around the state — in which caucus-goers will be able to vote for one of the other two remaining GOP candidates (Trump or long shot Texas businessman Ryan Binkley) but not for Haley. Whoever wins the caucuses will add to their official delegate tally, and that person is almost certain to be Trump. But the caucus winner won’t enjoy the kind of media attention and momentum boost that typically accrue to a victorious candidate, for the simple reason that he wouldn’t have defeated (or even competed against) his last major challenger.

The mess stems from a disagreement between state Republicans and Democrats over the format, with the latter preferring a primary and the former a caucus.

You can read more about the unusual dueling nominating contests here.

• Feb. 8: Virgin Islands caucuses

Haley has campaigned virtually in the Virgin Islands in recent weeks, hoping to snag the U.S. territory’s four delegates.

• Feb. 13: Long Island special election

Voters in New York’s Third Congressional District will pick a successor to George Santos, who was expelled from Congress in December following a scathing House Ethics Committee report that concluded he “blatantly stole from his campaign.” The candidates are former Democratic Rep. Tom Suozzi, who held the seat for six years before leaving to run for governor in 2022, and Republican Mazi Melesa Pilip.

• Feb. 24: South Carolina Republican primary

• Feb. 27: Michigan primary

• March 5: Super Tuesday

More than a third of all GOP delegates will be up for grabs on Super Tuesday, as 15 states — Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont and Virginia — and one territory (American Samoa) hold their primaries or caucuses. Trump is not on the ballot in Colorado or Maine, where election officials declared him ineligible because of his role in the Jan. 6, 2021, Capitol insurrection. Trump is appealing, and the cases could wind up in the Supreme Court.

Conventions

A massive display on the jumbotron at the United Center in Chicago promoting it as the site of the 2024 Democratic National Convention.A massive display on the jumbotron at the United Center in Chicago promoting it as the site of the 2024 Democratic National Convention.

The United Center in Chicago, the site of the 2024 Democratic National Convention. (E. Jason Wambsgans/Chicago Tribune/Tribune News Service via Getty Images) (Chicago Tribune via Getty Images)

• July 15-18: Republican National Convention

The event will be held in Milwaukee, which hosted the 2020 Democratic National Convention during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic.

• Aug. 19-22: Democratic National Convention

The event will be held in Chicago, which has hosted 11 previous Democratic conventions — most recently in 1996, when Bill Clinton and Al Gore were nominated for reelection. It was also the site of the disastrous 1968 Democratic convention, which was held in the wake of the assassinations of Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert F. Kennedy and marred by massive antiwar protests that turned violent.

Debates

A split screen showing images of Donald Trump and Joe Biden on a smartphone during a presidential debate in Nashville in 2020.A split screen showing images of Donald Trump and Joe Biden on a smartphone during a presidential debate in Nashville in 2020.

Trump and Biden during a presidential debate in Nashville in 2020. (SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images) (SOPA Images via Getty Images)

• Sept. 16: 1st presidential debate

The Commission on Presidential Debates has scheduled three presidential debates, the first on Sept. 16 at Texas State University in San Marcos, Texas, as well as a vice presidential debate in late September.

• Sept. 25: Vice presidential debate

The lone sanctioned vice presidential debate will take place at Lafayette College in Easton, Pa., on Sept. 25.

• Oct. 1: 2nd presidential debate

The second presidential debate will take place at Virginia State University in Petersburg, Va., on Oct. 1.

• Oct. 9: 3rd presidential debate

The third and final presidential debate will take place at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City on Oct. 9, less than a month from Election Day.

• Nov. 5: Election Day

• Dec. 17: Deadline for electors to cast their votes

This was a routine, unremarkable ritual of U.S. democracy until the 2020 election — and the events that followed.

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